FREQUENTLY
ASKED QUESTIONS



Any new invention arouses considerable interest and enquiries. The inventor has received the following questions on a regular basis and the answers may be of interest to you.

Question:

How did you develop the idea of using both sides
of the coil?

Answer:

As we all know, you cannot have a magnet with only one magnetic pole, so when I first became interested in an electric motor, I wondered why past electric motor designers had only used one side (the outside) of the energized coil. Because the energized coils are joined at the centre, it was not possible to use both sides. So I set about designing an electric motor that could use both sides of the energized coils. The result is the GEMINI Electric Motor.

Question:

Did you try other designs?

Answer:

Yes. Many designs and configurations before discovering the present invention. My first efforts used a flat disc system with magnets positioned in the circumference and a 'U' shaped energised coil positioned at 90 degrees to the disc. That arrangement worked but there were plenty of problems with that design.

Question:

Does the Gemini motor draw any extra current?

Answer:

No. The Gemini motor draws the same current to have the motor work on the inner magnets only, the outer magnets only, or both the inner and outer magnets together.


Question:

Does the Gemini have regeneration capabilities?

Answer:

Yes. The GEMINI design can, like some other motors, regenerate electricity when, as in bike and motor vehicle applications, the vehicle is coasting and not under power, however, unlike other motors the GEMINI produces an independent electrical current from normally unused electromagnetic fields which exist because of the motor's unique design - and the GEMINI can generate electricity at all times, even when under load.


Question:

Can the GEMINI be used as a generator?

Answer:

Yes, and very effectively, because it has two electromagnetic fields from which to generate electricity.

Question:

Why did you choose ferrite magnets?

Answer:

They are very cost effective and fit with our philosophy of producing a low cost electric motor. We are also testing the much stronger and more expensive rare earth magnets in some applications which make greater power demands on the motor.

Question:

Did you have any trouble getting permanent magnets?

Answer:

Yes. Any new invention rarely allows for off the shelf supply of components and we had to have magnets made to our specifications. This required production of dies to the appropriate curved shape. My initial prototypes were made and tested with whatever magnets I could get to prove the invention worked.

Question:

Are there many types of magnets?

Answer:

Yes. There are many types of magnets available and I spent many hours researching the types and performance characteristics and properties of magnets and their various applications.

Question:

Did you have difficulty in obtaining a commutator for the switching of the electrical current?

Answer:

Yes. In fact I invented a brush commutator suitable for the task. I had tried relay switches, laser pick ups, electronic systems, etc. My first success was with a relay switch which was activated by the strength of the rare earth magnets. This disc motor revolved quickly, and at the time I was quite excited however, it did not achieve anything like the speeds obtained by the GEMINI design. Prototypes of the GEMINI using ferrite magnets have given consistent speeds of 960rpm on 12 volts, 1960rpm on 24 volts. 3000rpm on 36 volts and over 4000rpm on 48 volts.

Question:

Why did you use a carbon brush commutator?

Answer:

Their cheaper cost is consistent with the low cost manufacturing goals for the GEMINI and brush commutators are much cheaper than electronic commutators. Also, brush commutators can be easily replaced and repaired in any part of the world. As a lower cost electric motor we expect the GEMINI to be very popular in low tech countries.

Question :

        How does the magnetic flux "back iron" effect           the efficiency of the Gemini Electric Motor ?

Answer:

           If the magnetic flux lines ( back iron effect ) traveled  through the rotor as they do in a conventional electric motor, then they would have to pass through four air gaps, which would mean an efficient motor, but in the Gemini design, the magnetic flux lines travel through the side plate, requiring the magnetic flux to pass through two air gaps only. The side plate is connected to both outer and inner metal backing plate rings, on which the permanent magnets are attached. The magnetic flux lines travel through the path of least resistance. This is an important fact when calculating the size wire and number of turns. It would require much greater amps and current on the energised coils if they had to jump four air gaps and not just two, resulting in a loss of efficiency.

Fig.1. shows the back iron effect if the magnetic flux was to travel in the same way as an ordinary electric motor.

                                     Fig. 1.

Fig. 2. shows the magnetic flux passing through the side plate.

 

                                        Fig. 2.

Fig. 3. shows a side view of the magnetic flux passing through the side plate.

                  Fig. 3.

WHAT's
NEW

   

A very exciting and interesting fact is that the Gemini Electric Motor, fitted with either Ceramic or Neodymium permanent magnets does not draw more than 27-30 amps, even under a heavy load. If the load forces the Gemini Electric Motor to slow in r.p.m. ( revolutions per minute ) the amount of amps drawn will be correspondingly reduced, unlike all other motors, which will draw large amounts of amps even though r.p.m. have reduced, and motor efficiency is falling sharply. This property of using permanent magnets both sides of the energized coil appears to choke the amount of electric current being drawn. Making the use of the common deep cycle lead acid battery a viable application, with the use of household electricity for recharging. 

I expect to power a small car for city use using 48 -120 volts and up to 30 amps, depending on speed required.

The Gemini Electric Motor & Generator is not available for sale at the present time, but progress is still being made on the electric car and outboard engine.

Work has been on going with the Gemini Electric Generator, which is expected to be used on the Ettridge Wind Turbine, details at: www.ettridgewindturbine.com the generator will be mounted to form the base of the wind turbine, with the bearing mountings of the Gemini Electric Generator moved apart so that turbine blades are directly attached to the bearing housing, eliminating the cost of additional bearings. The larger Gemini Electric Generator has 30 energized coils, and 20 sets of U brackets with the Ceramic permanent magnets attached. The energized coils are connected in groups of six, which eliminates the need for a gear box, as at low wind speed, only one group will have its wiring circuit closed. As the wind speed increases, additional groups have their circuits closed to make use of the increased torque generated by the wind turbine. So it is obvious that at very low wind speeds the Gemini Electric Generator will generate an electric current, but the amount of current produced increases as the wind speed is increased. If all the wiring circuits where closed, it would mean that a higher wind speed was needed to overcome the cogging effect between the energised coils and the ceramic permanent magnets, for the generator to start rotating and produce a usable electric current.

 

The above picture shows the "U" bracket with the permanent magnets fitted and is Fig.3 from the patent application.